SellTheArt.com

Oil Patch Cowhands – limited edition giclee canvas framed

Limited edition print certificate attached. 7181/15,000

 

 

Numbered print 1631/2000 certificate of authenticity available

Star of Wonder numbered print 8834/10660. Certificate of authenticity available

Numbered print with certificate of authenticity

8797/10461

747/950 Lithograph Print – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher

“At the edge of the sea, this arctic family pauses before venturing into the real world of the polar bear. This is the world of sea and pack ice. Polar bears are completely at home in the sea with their waterproof fur and broad, flat feet furred almost to the toes.” – Robert Bateman. – Print released 1979.

Robert Bateman, OC OBC is a Canadian naturalist and painter, born in Toronto, Ontario. Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature. It was not until the mid-1960s that he changed to his present style, realism. In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto. Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Bateman moved on to be an art/geography teacher at Nelson High School. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist. In 1999, the Audubon Society of Canada declared Bateman one of the top 100 environmental proponents of the 20th century.

98/950 Lithographic Print – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher

“The idea for this painting came while driving on one of those bright, cold, January days, with a strong northwest wind following a snowstorm. The back roads near our home were mostly blown bare, but here and there they were clogged with thick drifts…then the thought occurred to me about traveling in the Arctic. What if you entered a drift and unknown to you, a polar bear entered the drift from the other side. By the time you both knew this, it would be too late. With polar bears it is important to see them from as far away as possible. As soon as I returned from the drive, I did a sketch of the concept. This painting is the way I expressed the discovery.” – Robert Bateman. – Print published in 1980

Robert Bateman, OC OBC is a Canadian naturalist and painter, born in Toronto, Ontario. Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature. It was not until the mid-1960s that he changed to his present style, realism. In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto. Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Bateman moved on to be an art/geography teacher at Nelson High School. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist. In 1999, the Audubon Society of Canada declared Bateman one of the top 100 environmental proponents of the 20th century.

395/950 Lithograph Print – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher

Ursus maritimus. – Print released 1986.

Robert Bateman, OC OBC is a Canadian naturalist and painter, born in Toronto, Ontario. Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature. It was not until the mid-1960s that he changed to his present style, realism. In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto. Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Bateman moved on to be an art/geography teacher at Nelson High School. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist. In 1999, the Audubon Society of Canada declared Bateman one of the top 100 environmental proponents of the 20th century.

34/56 Artist Proof – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher

Polar bears are generally loners. They seldom cooperate on the kill, and mated pairs are rarely seen together. However, the female will spend a long time with her one or two cubs giving them lessons of the hunt. Sometimes the young bear can be almost as big as its mother before it goes out on its own.

“In this painting, I have been gazing into the landscape which is the direction I want the viewer to gaze. I would like the viewer to be carried back across the pack ice, past the sea mist and up the rugged valley. As we move up the valley, we explore waterfalls, cliffs and concave and convex slopes. Finally, we reach the top and the permanent ice cap, which has formed into a massive, simple sculpture.” – Robert Bateman. – Published in 1982.

Robert Bateman, OC OBC is a Canadian naturalist and painter, born in Toronto, Ontario. Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature. It was not until the mid-1960s that he changed to his present style, realism. In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto. Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Bateman moved on to be an art/geography teacher at Nelson High School. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist. In 1999, the Audubon Society of Canada declared Bateman one of the top 100 environmental proponents of the 20th century.

22/56 Artist Proof – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher

“My main interest in doing this painting was in exploring the fur, which is not really white but a glowing cream color. Moving across the bear from muzzle to head to flank is an adventure for the eyes. It is like flying over a complex landscape. The pale, uniform color of the polar bear allows me to concentrate on the form in this landscape without the confusing variables of pattern and color. I want one to be able to feel the fur in one’s imagination. I certainly would not want to try in real life.” – Robert Bateman. – Print released in 1982.

Robert Bateman, OC OBC is a Canadian naturalist and painter, born in Toronto, Ontario. Bateman was always interested in art, but never intended to make a living from it. He was fascinated by the natural world in his childhood; he recorded the sightings of all of the birds in the area of his house in Toronto. He found inspiration from the Group of Seven; he was also interested in making abstract paintings of nature. It was not until the mid-1960s that he changed to his present style, realism. In 1954, he graduated with a degree in geography from Victoria College in the University of Toronto. Afterwards, he attended Ontario College of Education. Although the stage was set for an expert wildlife artist, Bateman moved on to be an art/geography teacher at Nelson High School. However, he still painted in his free time. It wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that his work started to receive major recognition. Robert Bateman’s show in 1987, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, drew a large crowd for a living artist. In 1999, the Audubon Society of Canada declared Bateman one of the top 100 environmental proponents of the 20th century.

#13/180

Limited edition print on canvas

Gallery framed. Can remove from frame for cheaper shipping!

REDUCED PRICE $2700.00

Latest Submissions for Sale


Garden Angel

Limited edition print certificate attached. 7181/15,000    

Trisha Romance Song birds

Numbered print 1631/2000 certificate of authenticity available

Trisha Romance Star of Wonder

Star of Wonder numbered print 8834/10660. Certificate of authenticity available

Trisha Romance Heart to Heart

Numbered print with certificate of authenticity 8797/10461

Arctic Family

747/950 Lithograph Print – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher “At the edge of the sea, this arctic family pauses before venturing into the real world of the polar bear. This is the world of sea and pack ice. Polar bears are completely at…

White Encounter

98/950 Lithographic Print – Museum Quality Gallery Framed – Non-glare Glass – Sold Out at Publisher “The idea for this painting came while driving on one of those bright, cold, January days, with a strong northwest wind following a snowstorm. The back roads near our home were mostly blown bare,…